Singapore Airlines teases Airbus A350 for Brisbane and Perth

Singapore Airlines teases Airbus A350 for Brisbane, Perth

 

Singapore Airlines will bring another Australian city under the wing of its growing Airbus A350 network this year, with Brisbane and Perth both on the shortlist.

The Star Alliance member already has one year-round A350 flight slated for Melbourne’s SQ207/SQ208 from May 11, while a second A350 is currently running on SQ218/SQ217 until June 30, after which it will revert to the Airbus A380 superjumbo.

“We are now looking at an announcement later on which is the next A350 to Australia,” Singapore Airlines Regional Vice-President for South West Pacific, Mr TK Tan, tells Australian Business Traveller.

Sydney-siders shouldn’t get their hopes up for a ride in SQ’s advanced jetliner, however.

“It’s unlikely to be Sydney because we want a first class product for Sydney, as most of our flights for Sydney have a first class product,” Tan reveals, “so most likely it will be to another point in Australia.”

The coin toss is believed to be between Brisbane and Perth, both of which are strong parts of SQ’s Australian network and host several daily flights on Airbus A330 and Boeing 777-200 jets.

For either city the Airbus A350 would not only represent a jump in the quality of the experience – from a smoother, quieter and more relaxing ride to Singapore Airlines’ latest business class and economy seats – but also see premium economy added to the market.

As previously reported and exclusively to Australian Business Traveller, Tan also revealed that Sydney is likely to see the airline’s first new Airbus A380 superjumbo – sporting all-new first class suites and business class seats – in the fourth quarter of this year but ideally on October 25, to mark the tenth anniversary of the arrival of the world’s first commercial A380 service in 2007.

 

 

Australian Business Traveller

Brisbane Metro to expand to Chermside, Carindale and Springwood

EXCLUSIVE

Source : Brisbane Times

Brisbane’s new airport set to emerge from the sand

JANUARY 15 2017 – 12:21PM 

Tony Moore

Flag of Australia.svg

Work will begin this year on transforming Queensland’s “largest sandpit” at Brisbane Airport into the newest gateway to Australia – a facility with the same capacity as busy Singapore Airport.

The sandy area – more than eight metres deep in some places and three kilometres long – will become Brisbane’s $1.4 billion new parallel runway by September 2020.

Brisbane's New Parallel Runway project director Paul Coughlan (left) with works inspector Des Hasemann on top of 11 ...

The weight of the 11 million cubic metres of sand has already acted like a giant sponge drawing out water for the past two years.

“Parts of this site have settled almost three metres,” Brisbane’s New Parallel Runway project director Paul Coughlan said.

11 million cubic metres of sand is about to become transformed in Brisbane's new Parallel Runway at Brisbane Airport.

“The water loss and settlement has slowed dramatically so that is why we are now ready to begin construction, because what is called your ‘primary settlement’ has occurred,” he said.

The runway will mean the number of landings and departures from Brisbane Airport will increase from 227,000 flights a year to 360,000 by 2035 and up to half a million flights a year by 2045.

The first of three new projects to begin this year is a major underpass behind the Domestic Terminal allowing for road traffic to pass underneath and aircraft to cross between the old and new runways.

The $120 million Drynadra Road’s winning tender is expected to be announced within weeks and construction will begin in March 2017. Preparation work is already underway.

New Dryandra Road underpass to be built at Brisbane Airport in 2017 near the Domestic Terminal

By mid-year the second major contract – a $750 million contract to begin building the actual pavement of the new runway – will begin to shape sand into runways.

A $10 million project to build a metre-high new seawall to fight rising tides and storm surges will also begin.

New Parallel Runway at Brisbane Airport.

“So 2017 is the start of the really exciting construction of all of the final works for our runway system is about to begin,” Paul Coughlan said.

“The government in the 1980s was planning for parallel runways at the airport and now the Brisbane Airport Corporation is finally delivering that 30-year vision,” he said.

Even though right now it still looks like a huge sand bunker.

The cost of the $1.4 billion project is being met by Brisbane Airport Corporation (75 per cent) and by plane customers (25 per cent) who pay between an extra 35 cents to $1.35 cents on their tickets.

The world’s largest airlines who pay to use Brisbane Airport – including Qantas and Virgin – are not directly paying for the new runway. They passed the cost on to their customers in small ticket price increases, Mr Coughlan said.

Brisbane Airport Corporation has however already spent more than $550 million on the design, the drainage systems, the exporting of sand from Moreton Bay and the sand compaction.

Effectively they have had to rebuild a new Kedron Brook Floodway drain.

“If you looked at this site before we reclaimed it, it was all just tidal creeks, so you had water from the airport than just ran out into tidal creeks,” Mr Coughlan said.

“And so because we were going to reclaim (the tidal creeks) we had to create a new drainage system.”

He said there were no environmental problems identified, though the project team had a large team of consultants monitoring water flow into the new water channels.

Around half the sand will now progressively be moved to two new areas – near the existing domestic terminal apron and also, opposite the domestic airport.

Here, opposite the existing domestic terminal a new terminal will be built at Brisbane Airport in around 20 years.

 

Source : Brisbane Times

Página 365 de 366- Veja a distância entre Dubai e Brisbane

Distância de Dubai para Brisbane
A distancia é 11979 km ou 7443 milhas ou 6468 milhas náuticas
A distância é a distância do ar teórica (distância ortodrômica). Voar entre aeroportos dos dois locais pode ser uma distância diferente, dependendo da localização dos aeroportos e via real escolhida.
Mapa – caminho mais curto entre Dubai e Brisbane

Map – Shortest path between Dubai and Brisbane

Dubai

Brisbane

O mapa está usando uma projeção que faz a terra e oceanos muito mais amplo perto do pólo sul e pólos norte. O título / curso / rolamento durante um voo varia na maioria dos casos. Roteiro com base na imagem da NASA.

Dubai
Latitude: 25 ° 16 ‘Norte
Longitude: 55 ° 18 ‘East
posição inicial: 112,6 ° Leste-sudeste
título final: 109,8 ° Leste-sudeste

Brisbane
Latitude: 27 ° 28 ‘Sul
Longitude: 153 ° 02 ‘do leste
posição inicial: 289,8 ° oeste-noroeste
título final: 292.6 ° Oeste-noroeste

timeanddate.com > Distance Calculator

Página 365 de 366- Qual é a distância entre Guadalajara e Brisbane?

Distância de Guadalajara a Brisbane
A distancia é 12344 km ou 7670 milhas ou 6665 milhas náuticas
A distância é a distância do ar teórica (distância ortodrômica). Voar entre aeroportos dos dois locais pode ser uma distância diferente, dependendo da localização dos aeroportos e via real escolhida.
Mapa – caminho mais curto entre Guadalajara e Brisbane

Map – Shortest path between Guadalajara and Brisbane

Guadalajara

Brisbane

O mapa é usando uma projeção que faz a terra e oceanos muito mais amplas perto do pólo sul e pólo norte. O título / curso/ rolamento durante um voo varia na maioria dos casos. Roteiro com base na imagem da NASA.

Guadalajara
Latitude: 20 ° 40 ‘Norte
Longitude: 103 ° 21 ‘Oeste
posição inicial: 247.5 ° Oeste-sudoeste
título final: 256.9 ° Oeste-sudoeste
Brisbane
Latitude: 27 ° 28 ‘Sul
Longitude: 153 ° 02 ‘do leste
posição inicial: 76,9 ° leste-nordeste
título final: 67,5 ° leste-nordeste

timeanddate.com > Distance Calculator

Página 365 de 366- Veja a distância entre Vancouver e Brisbane #MiercolesDeGanarSeguidores

Distância de Vancouver a Brisbane
A distancia é 11851 km ou 7364 milhas ou 6399 milhas náuticas
A distância é a distância do ar teórica (distância ortodrômica). Voar entre aeroportos dos dois locais ‘pode ser uma distância diferente, dependendo da localização dos aeroportos e via real escolhida. Map – Shortest path between Vancouver and Brisbane

Mapa – caminho mais curto entre Vancouver e Brisbane
Vancouver
Brisbane
O mapa é usando uma projeção que faz a terra e oceanos muito mais amplo perto do pólo sul e pólos norte. O título / curso / rolamento durante um voo varia na maioria dos casos. Roteiro com base na imagem da NASA.
Vancouver
Latitude: 49 ° 17 ‘Norte
Longitude: 123 ° 07 ‘Oeste
posição inicial: 247.1 ° Oeste-sudoeste
título final: 222,6 ° Sudoeste
Brisbane
Latitude: 27 ° 28 ‘Sul
Longitude: 153 ° 02 ‘do leste
posição inicial: 42,6 ° Nordeste
título final: 67,1 ° leste-nordeste

timeanddate.com > Distance Calculator

 

 

Singapore Airlines adding more flights to Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney in 2017

Singapore Airlines (SIA) is adding extra flights to its already-hefty Australian schedule in 2017, with Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney set to receive more services.

Melbourne will increase to 31 flights a week from July 17 2017, from 28 currently, with a fifth daily service to operate on Monday, Friday and Saturday with Airbus A330-300s as a red-eye from Singapore and lunchtime departure from the Victorian capital.

Meanwhile, SIA is switching one of its four daily Melbourne-Singapore flights to a four-class Boeing 777-300ER featuring first, business, premium economy and economy from January.

On the Brisbane-Singapore route, SIA said it grow its schedule to 28 flights a week, from 24 currently, from August 22 2017.

And the Star Alliance member will have 35 flights a week (or five flights a day) on the Sydney-Singapore route during the peak travel period between June and September 2017. Outside of this peak period, SIA operates 33 times a week between Sydney and Singapore. Separately, SIA said it would have double-daily A380 flights to the NSW capital during the peak winter period.

The planned capacity increases comes after SIA launched its new Capital Express service linking Singapore, Canberra and Wellington in September.

The Virgin Australia shareholder and alliance partner had planned a new Sydney-Jakarta-Singapore flight that was due to launch in November. However, the launch was postponed due to what SIA said was runway maintenance works at Jakarta’s Soekarno-Hatta International Airport.

And the airline has also boosted its premium passenger offering with a new SilverKris lounge at Brisbane Airport.

SIA regional vice president for South West Pacific Tan Tiow Kor noted 2017 marked the airline’s 50th year of operations to Australia.

“We are looking forward to the year ahead and are excited by the prospect of celebrating our 50th anniversary flying to Australia,” Tan said in a statement.

“The increase in services and capacity announced today reinforce our longstanding commitment and investment to Australia and the South West Pacific region.”

Figures from the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics showed SIA was Australia’s second largest foreign carrier in the 12 months to June 30 2016 with an 8.4 per cent share of the market in terms of passengers carried.

At its peak, SIA and its regional wing Silkair have 145 flights a week between Singapore and Australia, serving Adelaide, Brisbane, Canberra, Cairns, Darwin, Melbourne, Perth and Sydney.

 

Australian Aviation

Hawaiian utilises ASPIRE fuel saving initiatives on Honolulu-Brisbane flight

Hawaiian Airlines Airbus A330-200 H380HA takes off from Brisbane. (Aaron Taylor)

A file image of Hawaiian Airlines’ Airbus A330-200 taking off from Brisbane Airport. (Aaron Taylor)

Hawaiian Airlines says it will reduce carbon dioxide emissions by about 670,000 kilograms a year on its three times weekly Brisbane-Honolulu flights through the use of more efficient operations on the ground and in the air.

Tuesday’s flight HA443, operated by Airbus A330-200 N378HA, was the first time Hawaiian had flown the route utilising seven environmental best practice measures outlined by the Asia and Pacific Initiative to Reduce Emissions (ASPIRE).

The ASPIRE group brings together Australia’s Airservices, Airways New Zealand, the US Federal Aviation Administration, Japan Air Navigation Services (JANS), the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) and AeroThai in partnership to develop ideas that improve environmental standards and operational procedures in an effort to reduce fuel burn and carbon dioxide emissions.

It advocates a number of practices to improve the efficiency of flight covering ground taxiing, route optimisation and more collaborative decision making between air navigation service providers, airport operations, ground handling services, aircraft operators and other stakeholders.

Tuesday’s flight featured numerous taxiing, in-flight and landing procedures that were estimated to have saved about 680 kilograms of fuel thanks to the support of Airservices, Brisbane Airport and others, Hawaiian said.

These included User Preferred Routes, which enables airlines to customise more efficient flight paths; Dynamic Airborne Reroute Procedures, where airlines are able to change flight paths en route factoring in updated weather information; and Optimised Descent Profile, which helps cut down changes in engine thrust as the aircraft comes in to land.

And Thursday’s reciprocal HA444, scheduled to depart Brisbane at 2145, would also be flown under ASPIRE measures.

Brisbane-Honolulu is Hawaiian’s second route operated under ASPIRE principles, following Auckland-Honolulu which started on April 22.

Hawaiian chief pilot for operations Captain Brian Beres, who along with first officer Jason Akina and international relief officer David Kahoaka was at the controls of flight HA443, said the airline worked closely with Brisbane Airport, Airservices and other regulatory and air traffic management bodies to ensure everything went smoothly.

“In order to really make best use of these efficiency procedures, we have to work together so we are on the same page, we understand what the other needs,” Beres told Australian Aviation in an interview on Wednesday.

“Prior to our ASPIRE flight yesterday we had a number of calls with all of the various parties that are involved from regulatory to air traffic management and the airline obviously to make sure that we are all coordinated in these procedures that we were going to demonstrate on these two flights.

“So yes, there is a high degree of coordination.

“It also gives the ability I think as a group to lobby for change and being proactive in the direction of reducing our carbon emissions and fuel burn, the mission being to lessen the impact of aviation on the environment.”

Brisbane Airport general manager of operations Stephen Goodwin said the airport and its ground handler provided assistance through ensuring ground power units and pre-conditioned air was available for Hawaiian’s two services.

“Brisbane Airport Corporation is proud to support Hawaiian Airlines in showcasing environmental strategies that reduce fuel burn and carbon emissions in aviation operations,” Goodwin said.

Airservices executive general manager of air navigation services Stephen Angus said: “Our role at Airservices is to use efficient air traffic management practices to ensure the success of the ASPIRE flight.”

“This new route is another example of airlines, airports and air navigation agencies working together to reduce aviation emissions globally.”

After a series of demonstration flights in 2008 from Air New Zealand, Japan Airlines, Qantas, Singapore Airlines and United, there are now daily ASPIRE flights out of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore and Thailand, according to the ASPIRE website.

A map of daily ASPIRE routes. (ASPIRE)

Australian Aviation

Gate Gourmet opens new Brisbane catering centre

Gate Gourmet's new Brisbane Airport catering centre. (Gate Gourmet)

Gate Gourmet has opened the doors to its new aviation catering facility at Brisbane Airport.

The global aviation catering company’s managing director for Oceania Tony Woodhouse said the new facility would ensure Gate Gourmet was well placed for the expected growth in air traffic at Brisbane in the years ahead, particularly with the new parallel runway expected to open in 2020.

“A key factor behind our investment is that Brisbane is a great airport to work from,” Woodhouse said in a statement.

“Our Brisbane team have a strong network here and as a result, we simply outgrew our previous location at Hakea Street.

“This new Westringia Road address is 2,455 square metres – four times bigger than our previous site – giving us both airside and landside access to the tarmac, which is the ideal position to be in with the airport’s second parallel runway coming.”

Gate Gourmet's Tony Woodhouse. (Gate Gourmet)

Gate Gourmet’s Tony Woodhouse. (Gate Gourmet)

The company supplies food and other services for about 80 flights a day at Brisbane, with domestic clients including Virgin Australia and Tigerair Australia. Gate Gourmet said it would begin suppling Aircalin from December 1.

Gate Gourmet said its new Brisbane facility, which represented a $6 million investment over five years, featured a cold kitchen, dishwashing and cartwashing, food portioning, bonded stores, assembly and equipment packing. A hot kitchen was due to be completed in 2017.

Brisbane Airport handled 22.5 million passengers in 2015/16, comprising 5.3 million international and 17.2 million domestic travellers. The airport’s 2014 master plan forecasts passenger numbers to reach 11.7 million international and 37 million domestic passengers, for a total of 48.7 million, by 2033/34.

BNE Property’s general manager of commercial businesses John Tormey said the airport was spending $1.4 billion on the new parallel runway and $3.8 billion on infrastructure projects over the next decade.

“Our investment in the airport precinct is more significant than any other Australian airport,” Tormey said.

“We’re excited to be working with Gate Gourmet who have been a long term tenant of the airport and a key support service that helps attract more international services to Brisbane Airport.”

The expanded Brisbane facility complements Gate Gourmet’s operations at Sydney, where it has 31 airline customers.

Some scenes from the official opening can be seen below:

Inside the new Brisbane catering centre. (Gate Gourmet)

Some food on offer at the official opening. (Gate Gourmet)

Food at the official opening of Gate Gourmet's Brisbane catering centre. (Gate Gourmet)

Qual é a distância entre Kuala Lumpur e Brisbane? #SegundaDetremuraSDV

Distância de Kuala Lumpur para Brisbane
A distancia é 6460 km ou 4014 milhas ou 3488 milhas náuticas
A distância é a distância do ar teórica (distância ortodrômica). Voar entre aeroportos dos dois locais pode ser uma distância diferente, dependendo da localização dos aeroportos e via real escolhida.

Map – Shortest path between Kuala Lumpur and Brisbane

Mapa – caminho mais curto entre Kuala Lumpur e Brisbane
Kuala Lumpur
Brisbane
O mapa é usando uma projeção que faz a terra e oceanos muito mais amplo perto do pólo sul e pólos norte. O título / curso / rolamento durante um voo varia na maioria dos casos. Roteiro com base na imagem da NASA.

Kuala Lumpur
Latitude: 3 ° 09 ‘Norte
Longitude: 101 ° 42 ‘do leste
posição inicial: 125,3 ° Sudeste
título final: 113,4 ° Leste-sudeste
Brisbane
Latitude: 27 ° 28 ‘Sul
Longitude: 153 ° 02 ‘do leste
posição inicial: 293,4 ° oeste-noroeste
título final: 305,3 ° Noroeste

timeanddate.com > Distance Calculator