Consolidados Grande SP 30/07/2018

Resultado de imagem para TV aberta

No consolidado, o último capítulo de Deus Salve o Rei empatou com a média de público de Segundo Sol. À tarde, Vídeo Show reage, mas fica em segundo no confronto direto com o quadro A Hora da Venenosa (Balanço Geral SP). Em baixa, reapresentação de Belíssima atinge média final de Malhação: Vidas Brasileiras.

Fofacalizando, programa de fofoca do SBT, vence estreia da reprise de Essas Mulheres (Record TV). A emissora de Silvio Santos também garante o segundo lugar com Roda a Roda, no confronto direto com A Terra Prometida.

Confira, abaixo, as audiências de segunda-feira, 30 de julho:


Hora Um – 4,6
Bom Dia São Paulo – 8,6
Bom Dia Brasil – 9,4
Mais Você – 8,0
Bem Estar – 7,7
Encontro – 7,8
SP1 – 12,5
Globo Esporte – 12,3
Jornal Hoje – 12,1
Vídeo Show – 9,7
Sessão da Tarde: A Estranha Vida de Timothy Green – 12,8
Vale a Pena Ver de Novo: Belíssima – 14,3
Malhação: Vidas Brasileiras – 16,4
Orgulho e Paixão – 22,1
SP2 – 28,7
Deus Salve o Rei – 34,2
Jornal Nacional – 33,3
Segundo Sol – 34,3
Tela Quente: Capitão Phillips – 19,7
Jornal da Globo – 9,5
Conversa com Bial – 5,8
Flash – 4,8


Primeiro Impacto – 4,2
Mundo Disney – 4,6
Bom Dia & Cia – 7,5
Fofocalizando – 7,3
Casos de Família – 7,7
Que Pobres Tão Ricos – 7,1
Coração Indomável – 9,3
Amanhã é Para Sempre – 8,6
SBT Brasil – 7,9
Roda a Roda – 11,9
As Aventuras de Poliana – 15,3
Chiquititas – 12,3
Z4 – 10,2
Programa do Ratinho – 8,9
Conexão Repórter – 7,3
The Noite – 6,0
Roda a Roda (reapresentação) – 4,3
SBT Notícias – 4,1


Balanço Geral Manhã – 1,9
São Paulo no Ar – 3,7
Fala Brasil – 6,3
Hoje em Dia – 5,6
Balanço Geral SP – 9,6
Luz do Sol – 6,0
Essas Mulheres – 5,7
Bicho do Mato – 6,1
Cidade Alerta – 11,1
A Terra Prometida – 9,7
Jesus – 10,4
Jornal da Record – 6,4
Repórter Record Investigação – 5,3
Programa do Porchat – 2,8

Um ponto no Ibope equivale a 71,9 mil domicílios. Esses números servem como referência para o mercado publicitário.

Fonte: IBOPE / MW – Praça São Paulo

O PLANETA TV

World’s biggest king penguin colony shrinks 90 percent

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This handout photo taken in 1982 and released on July 30, 2018 by the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS - Centre national de la recherche scientifique) shows a two-million-strong king penguin colony on Ile aux Cochon./AFP
This handout photo taken in 1982 and released on July 30, 2018 by the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS – Centre national de la recherche scientifique) shows a two-million-strong king penguin colony on Ile aux Cochon./AFP

Breaking News July 31, 2018 08:28

By Agence France-Presse

Paris

The planet’s largest colony of king penguins has declined by nearly 90 percent in three decades, alarmed researchers said Monday.

The last time scientists set foot on France’s remote Ile aux Cochons — roughly half way between the tip of Africa and Antarctica — the island was blanketed by two million of the flightless birds, which stand about a metre (three feet) tall.

But recent satellite images and photos taken from helicopters show the population has collapsed, with barely 200,000 remaining, according to a study published in Antarctic Science.

King penguins are home bodies. While adults will set to sea for days at a time foraging for food, the species does not migrate.

Why the colony on Ile aux Cochon has been so decimated remains a mystery.

“It is completely unexpected, and particularly significant since this colony represented nearly one third of the king penguins in the world,” said lead author Henri Weimerskirch, an ecologist at the Centre for Biological Studies in Chize, France, who first set eyes on the colony in 1982.

Climate change may play a role.

In 1997, a particularly strong El Nino weather event warmed the southern Indian Ocean, temporarily pushing the fish and squid on which king penguins depend south, beyond their foraging range.

“This resulted in population decline and poor breeding success” for all the king penguin colonies in the region, Weimerskirch said.

El Nino’s are cyclical events that occur every two to seven years. But they can be amplified by global warming, which itself produces many of the same results, albeit on a longer timescale.

Indeed, Weimerskirch and colleagues showed in an earlier study that climate change, on its current trajectory, will likely make the Iles Crozet — the archipelago that contains Ile aux Cochon — unviable for king penguins by mid-century.

Migration is not an option because there are no other suitable islands within striking range.

Other factors may be contributing to the decline of the Ile aux Cochon colony, including overcrowding.

One egg at a time

“The larger the population, the fiercer the competition between individuals,” noted a statement from France’s National Centre for Scientific Research, which funded the study.

“The repercussions of lack of food are thus amplified and can trigger an unprecedented rapid and drastic drop in numbers.”

But this so-called “density-dependent effect” can also be made worse by climate change, the study notes.

Another possible culprit is avian cholera, which has affected seabirds on nearby Marion and Amsterdam Islands, including some king penguins.

But until Weimerskirch and other researchers return to Ile aux Cochons — hopefully, he said, in early 2019 — they won’t know for sure.

It is also possible that invasive species such as rats, mice or cats, have found their way onto the island.

The Red List of Threatened Species conservation status for king penguins is currently “least concern,” but the new data may prompt a reevaluation.

King penguins are the second-largest penguin species after the Emperor.

They do not make a nest, but rather lay one egg at a time and carry it around on their feet covered with a flap of abdominal skin, called a brood patch.

Parents take turns incubating the egg, switching every couple of weeks over a two-month period.

There are two sub-species of kings. Aptenodytes patagonica patagonicus inhabits the Falklands and South Georgia Island, while Aptenodytes patagonica halli resides in the southernmost reaches of Indian Ocean and South Pacific.

 

Source :  The Nation Multimedia

Two Islamic State fighters riding motorbike killed in Iraq’s Diyala

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Diyala (IraqiNews.com) – Two Islamic State militants were killed Monday in an ambush in eastern Diyala province, a local official was quoted as saying.

Speaking to Alghad Press website, Moa’yed Norouz, the head of Balad Ruz’s municipal council, said, “Two IS militants riding a motorbike were killed after residents and security forces ambushed them in Shah Ali area, east of Diyala.”

The pair, according to Norouz, “were planning to launch attacks against residents in Shah Ali area.”

Although Islamic State militants suffered heavy losses since their defeat in Iraq last year, experts believe that the group is still seen as a security threat as its fighters are still making a comeback with a scatter-gun campaign of kidnap and killing.

Iraq declared victory over Islamic State in December with the help of a US-led alliance, having retaken all the territory captured by the extremists in 2014 and 2015.

IS declared a self-styled “caliphate” in a third of Iraq and neighboring Syria in 2014. A government campaign, backed by a U.S.-led international coalition and paramilitary forces, was launched in 2016 to retake IS-held regions, managing to retake all havens, most notably the city of Mosul, the group’s previously proclaimed capital.

 

Source :  Iraqi News

Sheikh Mohammed warns 5 federal departments over staff satisfaction

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Staff Reporter/Dubai
Filed on July 31, 2018 | Last updated on July 31, 2018 at 12.54 am

Erring departments get six months for course correction.

The UAE Vice-President has pulled up some federal government departments over their “unacceptable” employee satisfaction ratings. He has given managers of five government departments six months to improve the rating, saying “employee satisfaction is key to achieving customer satisfaction”.

His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, took to Twitter on Monday to reprimand the five departments after just 60 per cent of employees at these entities said they were satisfied at their workplace.

Sheikh Mohammed said he has reviewed the performance of 40 departments and some had registered employee satisfaction rates of up to 93 per cent. “The most precious capital for the government is its employees,” Sheikh Mohammed tweeted.

Earlier this month, Sheikh Mohammed had announced a string of workplace benefits for Dubai government staff to provide a “supportive work environment”. “The new law translates our vision for a better future for our employees and giving them happiness,” he had tweeted then.

The Dubai Ruler is well-known for his transparent and straightforward approach in increasing efficiency at government departments. In 2016, he had ordered nine senior officials at the Dubai Municipality to retire.

reporters@khaleejtimes.com

Source :  The Khaleej Times

Court orders Clive Palmer’s Mineralogy to pay up

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By Sonia Kohlbacher

Clive Palmer’s flagship company Mineralogy has lost a court bid to stall paying millions owed to a Singapore-based exploration firm.

Mineralogy launched three appeals against a Brisbane Supreme Court order to pay the $24 million it owed to BGP Geoexplorer for works it undertook in the Gulf of Papua for another Palmer-owned company, Palmer Petroleum.

Clive Palmer leaves the Supreme Court in Brisbane on Friday.

Clive Palmer leaves the Supreme Court in Brisbane on Friday.Photo: AAP/Glenn Hunt

It lost one of those appeals last year and a second on Tuesday when appeal court Justice Philip Morrison dismissed attempts to delay payment.

Commercial litigator Ashley Hill, for BGP Geoexplorer, said the money would be released after a ruling on a final appeal relating to how much interest should be paid.

Palmer Petroleum owns a number of offshore exploration licences west of Papua New Guinea’s capital, Port Moresby.

AAP

 

Source :  The Brisbane Times