Página 24 de 366 – ¿Cuál es la distancia entre Guadalajara y Canberra? Page 25 of 366

Distancia desde Guadalajara a Canberra

La distancia es 12866 kilómetros o 7994 millas o 6947 millas náuticas
La distancia es la distancia de aire teórico (distancia ortodrómica). Volar entre los aeropuertos de las dos localizaciones ‘puede ser una distancia diferente, dependiendo de la ubicación de los aeropuertos y la ruta real elegido.

Mapa – camino más corto entre Guadalajara y Canberra

Map – Shortest path between Guadalajara and Canberra

Ubicación de Guadalajara
Ubicación de Canberra

El mapa está usando una proyección que hace que la tierra y los océanos mucho más amplias cerca del polos norte y sur. El título / curso / rodamiento durante un vuelo varía en la mayoría de los casos. Mapa basado en la imagen de la NASA.

La partida de Guadalajara
Latitud: 20 ° 40 ‘Norte
Longitud: 103 ° 21 ‘Oeste
Epígrafe inicial: 239.8 ° Oeste-suroeste
Título final: 262.0 ° Oeste
La partida de Canberra
Latitud: 35 ° 17 ‘Sur
Longitud: 149 ° 08 ‘Este
Epígrafe inicial: 82,0 ° Este
Título final: 59,8 ° Este-noreste

Guadalajara (Mexico – Jalisco) Domingo, 24/01/2016, 20:45:00 CST UTC-6 hours
Canberra (Australia – Australian Capital Territory) Lunes, 25/01/2016, 13:45:00 AEDT UTC+11 hours

 

Fuente : http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/distanceresult.html?p1=92&p2=57

 

Page 24 of 366 – What is the distance between Guadalajara and Canberra? Page 25 of 366

Distance from Guadalajara to Canberra

Distance is 12866 kilometers or 7994 miles or 6947 nautical miles
The distance is the theoretical air distance (great circle distance). Flying between the two locations’ airports can be a different distance, depending on airport location and actual route chosen.

Map – Shortest path between Guadalajara and Canberra

Map – Shortest path between Guadalajara and Canberra

Location for Guadalajara
Location for Canberra

The map is using a projection that makes land and oceans much wider near the south and north poles. The heading/course/bearing during a flight varies in most cases. Map based on image from NASA.

Heading from Guadalajara
Latitude: 20° 40′ North
Longitude: 103° 21′ West
Initial heading: 239.8° West-southwest
Final heading: 262.0° West

Heading from Canberra
Latitude: 35° 17′ South
Longitude: 149° 08′ East
Initial heading: 82.0° East
Final heading: 59.8° East-northeast

Guadalajara (Mexico – Jalisco) Sunday, 24/01/2016, 20:30:00 CST UTC-6 hours
Canberra (Australia – Australian Capital Territory) Monday, 25/01/2016, 13:30:00 AEDT UTC+11 hours

Source :http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/distanceresult.html?p1=92&p2=57

Página 24 de 366 – Qual é a distância entre Guadalajara e Canberra ?

Distância de Guadalajara para Canberra

Distância é 12866 km ou 7994 milhas ou 6947 milhas náuticas
A distância é a distância do ar teórica (distância ortodrómica). Voar entre aeroportos dos dois locais pode ser uma distância diferente, dependendo da localização do aeroporto e via real escolhido.

Mapa – caminho mais curto entre Guadalajara e Canberra

Map – Shortest path between Guadalajara and Canberra

Localização para Guadalajara
Localização de Canberra

O mapa está usando uma projeção que faz a terra e oceanos muito mais amplas perto do sul e pólos norte. O título / curso / rolamento durante um voo varia na maioria dos casos. Roteiro baseado na imagem da NASA.

A posição de Guadalajara
Latitude: 20 ° 40 ‘Norte
Longitude: 103 ° 21 ‘Oeste
Posição inicial: 239,8 ° oeste-sudoeste
Posição final: 262,0 ° Oeste

A posição de Canberra
Latitude: 35 ° 17 ‘Sul
Longitude: 149 ° 08 ‘do leste
Posição inicial: 82,0 ° Este
Posição final: 59,8 ° leste-nordeste

Guadalajara (Mexico – Jalisco) Domingo, 24 de Janeiro de 2016, 20:15:00 CST UTC-6 horas
Canberra (Australia – Australian Capital Territory) Segunda-feira, 25 de Janeiro de 2016, 13:15:00 AEDT UTC+11 horas

Fonte : http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/distanceresult.html?p1=92&p2=57

We’ll consider backing Kevin Rudd for top UN spot: Julie Bishop

January 23, 2016 – 11:04PM

Adam Gartrell
National Political Correspondent

Kevin Rudd and Julie Bishop in 2011. Ms Bishop says the government will consider supporting Mr Rudd's bid to become UN Secretary-General if he nominates.

Kevin Rudd and Julie Bishop in 2011. Ms Bishop says the government will consider supporting Mr Rudd’s bid to become UN Secretary-General if he nominates. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

The Turnbull government will consider backing Kevin Rudd to become the next United Nations boss if he officially puts his hand up for the role.

Foreign Minister Julie Bishop says the former prime minister is yet to apply to become UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s replacement.

“Should Kevin Rudd nominate then of course the Australian government would consider what sort of support he would require,” she said in New York.

While the role is expected to go to an Eastern European candidate when Mr Ban leaves office at the end of the year, Mr Rudd is an outside chance and is understood to have been lobbying hard for the role, despite his public denials.

Former New Zealand prime minister Helen Clark, who is the administrator of the United Nations Development Programme, is also in contention.

Mr Rudd and Ms Bishop were once direct parliamentary adversaries, when he was foreign minister and she his shadow, sharing some fiery public exchanges. But behind the scenes they were friendly. Ms Bishop’s support would be considered critical to his chances.

Labor has said it would back Mr Rudd’s bid.

Source : WA Today

TasWeekend Indulge: Many reasons to seek Greek

January 24, 2016 11:00am

Source : The Mercury

Picnic permit: councils that charge to go to the park

January 24, 2016 – 6:02PM

Alana Schetzer, Anna Whitelaw

alt text for flag

Mary Cantsilieris, right, who had about 20 people attend her birthday party, had no idea she may be required to buy a permit.

Mary Cantsilieris, right, who had about 20 people attend her birthday party, had no idea she may be required to buy a permit. Photo: Justin McManus

Packed the picnic blanket? What about the dips and cheese? And don’t forget the sunscreen and permit.

Permit? As Melburnians flock to parks and gardens for Australia Day and other celebrations this summer to soak up the sun and spend time with family and friends, some councils are charging for social gatherings with anywhere between 20 and 500 guests.

At some of Melbourne’s most popular spots for a scenic afternoon, councils require groups to register and pay for a permit, which is then checked by patrolling council officers.

Laura Mcarthy celebrates her birthday with friends and a picnic in Edinburgh Gardens.

Laura Mcarthy celebrates her birthday with friends and a picnic in Edinburgh Gardens. Photo: Paul Jeffers

In Port Phillip, which includes popular bayside suburbs such as St Kilda, Elwood and Albert Park, parties of 20 or more people need an $82 permit, which buys them two hours to enjoy a beer and throw the frisbee around. Each additional hour costs $41.

Port Phillip locals who frequent those parks were shocked to hear they would be expected to pay to gather in public parks.

Bentleigh resident Mary Cantsilieris spent Sunday afternoon in Point Ormond park in Elwood at a picnic with family and friends.

Laura Mcarthy (foreground) celebrates her birthday with friends and a picnic in Edinburgh Gardens.

Laura Mcarthy (foreground) celebrates her birthday with friends and a picnic in Edinburgh Gardens. Photo: Paul Jeffers

The 30-year-old told Fairfax Media she had “no idea” she would have been expected to pay for a permit for the small gathering of 20-25 people.

“It is easier to get together in a park than at a restaurant, where all the kids can play outside,” she said.

“It is pretty unreasonable that we would be expected to pay for a permit. After all, we pay our rates and other taxes, and we’ve paid for parking.

Some councils are charging for social gatherings in some of Melbourne's most popular spots.

Some councils are charging for social gatherings in some of Melbourne’s most popular spots.

“I wouldn’t be surprised if they started charging us to go to the beach,” she said.

Port Phillip mayor Bernadene Voss said permits were used to ensure fair use for ratepayers and visitors –  there were 1.38 million visitors to the St Kilda area last financial year.

“On public holidays, we can attract large numbers of locals and visitors alike, with up to 80,000 people coming to our foreshores on New Year’s Eve. We’re expecting similar numbers or more for Australia Day, depending on the weather,” she said.

“We have a significant number of popular parks and beaches and we encourage people to share those public spaces to celebrate and have fun in the sun.

“These spaces experience strong demand and are often used throughout the entire day.”

At the Edinburgh Gardens in North Fitzroy, a popular destination frequented by food trucks, groups of 50 or more need a $95 permit from Yarra City Council.

Yarra has faced problems at Edinburgh Gardens in the past, with huge rave-style parties held on New Year’s Eve without a permit or notification.

Mayor Roberto Colanzi said a permit was also needed if groups wanted to reserve a section of a park.

Melbourne City Council, which is home to some of Melbourne’s biggest and most popular gardens including the Fitzroy Gardens and Carlton Gardens, requires groups of 50 or more to have a permit.

A Melbourne Council spokeswoman said council officers regularly check large groups to ensure they have approval.

Most Victorian councils require permits if a person or organisation is carrying out activities for commercial purposes, such as personal training. Weddings also often require a permit.

In the lead-up to Australia Day, the issue of “social squatting” has been raised, with some people arriving hours before their picnic or event to reserve the best spot.

The Melbourne Council spokeswoman said it was not an unusual practice, especially in summer, adding that the council very rarely received complaints about it.

“Our rangers are aware that arriving early to reserve a good picnic spot is a fairly common practice in our parks on busy public holidays such as Australia Day.

“Our rangers will often encounter families or groups that have been returning to the same barbecue spot on Australia Day for over 10 years.”

Cr Colanzi said the council had not received complaints about “squatting”.

Source : The Age

Mexican tenor to become citizen in Canberra on Australia Day

January 25, 2016 – 12:15AM

Megan Doherty

CITY REPORTER FOR THE CANBERRA TIMES

Flag of the Australian Capital Territory

Mexican tenor Diego Torre was in Canberra last November to sing at Voices in the Forest at the National Arboretum.

Mexican tenor Diego Torre was in Canberra last November to sing at Voices in the Forest at the National Arboretum. Photo: Melissa Adams

Last time he was in Canberra, Mexican tenor Diego Torre was filling the National Arboretum with his glorious voice.

This time he will be taking the oath to become an  Australian.

On Tuesday – Australia Day – he will be taking centre stage at the national citizenship ceremony.

And, he has been asked to sing the national anthem at the ceremony by Lake Burley Griffin to be attended by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

Torre will be one of 27 people from 13 countries becoming an Australian citizen on Tuesday in the national capital on Rond Terrace.

The 36-year-old Opera Australia star has been in Australia since 2011.

It was the birth of his daughter Johanna, now seven-months-old, that convinced him he wanted to become an Australian citizen.

“Everyone has been really, really nice to me, so supportive. Always with a happy face. I really like it so much,” he said.

“When my daughter was born I just realised I wanted her to also share all these feelings. I think it’s an amazing way to be.

“So when she was born my wife and I decided Australia would be a wonderful place to raise her.

“Opera Australia has been so supportive and I feel really this is my home. I have worked all around the world and for the first time that I feel that I’m home. I’m working doing what I love and at the same time I found this big family which is Opera Australia.”

Torre said he was living in New York when he met Opera Australia artistic director Lyndon Terracini who “was really excited about hearing my voice”.

“He invited me to come to Australia, which I did, in 2011,” he said.

“My first opera [for Opera Australia] was La Boheme [in 2013] which I sang 23 times in a row. It was a marvellous experience, everyone was really happy and I got some nice reviews.

“So since that moment, to now, I’ve been working with Opera Australia.”

His wife Paula, a Mexican-born musician and lawyer, is intending to apply for Australian citizenship in the middle of this year. Their daughter was actually born in America.

“She was born in the USA but after 15 days she was flying to Australia so I think she’s more Aussie than American,” he said.

Torre said he had never been tempted to take US citizenship.

“I’m a resident there but I never felt the same as with people here. It’s different in Australia,” he said.

“It’s far away from everywhere else. The system is not corrupt like other countries. It is a peaceful country.”

Torre’s first visit to Canberra was last November when he sang at Voices in the Forest. He was thrilled to be asked to sing the national anthem at the citizenship ceremony upon his return.

“It’s exciting,” he said. “When they asked me to do it, ‘Yes, of course. It’s going to be my honour to do it’.”

It will be a flying visit for the star who is in rehearsals for the opera Luisa Miller which will be performed at the Sydney Opera House next month.

Source : Canberra Times

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