North Korean troops’ life amid relaxed military alert

N. Korean troops' life amid relaxed military alert

In this photo taken from an observatory on South Korea’s Ganghwa Island on Aug. 26, 2015, North Korean soldiers carry reeds in Kaepung on the North’s western front-line bordering South Korea, one day after North Korea lifted the quasi-war state of its armed forces. The two Koreas’ reached an agreement the previous day on defusing tensions after four days of intensive inter-Korean talks. (Yonhap) (END)

N. Korean troops' life amid relaxed military alert

In this photo taken from an observatory on South Korea’s Ganghwa Island on Aug. 26, 2015, North Korean soldiers work at a field in Kaepung on the North’s western front-line bordering South Korea, one day after North Korea lifted the quasi-war state of its armed forces. The two Koreas’ reached an agreement the previous day on defusing tensions after four days of intensive inter-Korean talks. (Yonhap) (END)

N. Korean troops' life amid relaxed military alert

In this photo taken from an observatory on South Korea’s Ganghwa Island on Aug. 26, 2015, a North Korean soldier takes a nap at a sentry post in Kaepung on the North’s western front-line bordering South Korea, one day after North Korea lifted the quasi-war state of its armed forces. The two Koreas’ reached an agreement the previous day on defusing tensions after four days of intensive inter-Korean talks. (Yonhap) (END)

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Brisbane Roar debt must be addressed now, says Football Federation Australia

August 27, 2015 – 7:11PM

Beth Newman

Happier times ... Kofi Danning celebrates a Roar goal in April.

Happier times … Kofi Danning celebrates a Roar goal in April. Photo: Getty Images

The owners of debt-ridden Brisbane Roar could reportedly hang on to the club a little bit longer but Football Federation Australia wants to see a resolution to the club’s financial drama in a critical meeting on Friday.

As federation officials prepare to meet with the Bakrie Group powerbrokers, FFA chief executive David Gallop said an immediate solution needed to be found for the club’s troubles.

In a move almost as unexpected as that of their former stablemates, the Queensland Reds, reappointing embattled coach Richard Graham, the Bakrie Group is reportedly determined to keep the club’s licence until a reasonable sale price can be agreed.

Not wanting to lose out on their investment, which they say is $9 million over four years, the Bakrie Group is holding out for a buyer.

Gallop said the Bakrie Group’s ownership was hanging by a thread but was confident it would be able to find an ultimate saviour for the Roar, even if the FFA needed to take back the club’s licence, as they did with the Newcastle Jets.

“It is timely that the meeting is taking place tomorrow because the Bakrie Group’s ownership of the Brisbane Roar is now in the balance,” Gallop said.

“The choice is very clear. If the Bakrie Group wants to stay in the A-League, the debts need to be addressed immediately, wages need to be paid to staff and stability restored.

“The Brisbane Roar is a great club and its licence is a highly valuable asset. We are very confident that, if necessary, we can stabilise the club, find a new investor and create a bright future for the club. But the current uncertainty is damaging the club and we are no longer in a position to tolerate the situation.”

The Indonesian company has been looking for a buyer for the club since December last year and as recently as last month had announced a potential sale.

Last month, chairman Chris Fong, Bakrie Group vice-president, told supporters a buyer had been found, with just a price to be confirmed.

Since then the club was hit with a wind-up order from the Queensland Rugby Union over $60,000 of unpaid rent, which the Roar avoided at the last minute.

Player wages were reportedly paid late again this week, for the second time in three months, while staff payments are yet to be complete and multiple creditors have been left waiting for payments from the club.

The Canberra Times