Globo adia a estreia da série “Doctor Pri”, de Aguinaldo Silva

Com a grade preenchida para o primeiro semestre de 2014, a direção da Globo optou por adiar a estreia da série “Doctor Pri”, de Aguinaldo Silva.

A atração será exibida apenas no segundo semestre, após a Copa do Mundo.

“As gravações começam em janeiro e a estréia será em setembro, quando já estarei no ar com minha próxima novela, ou seja: 2014 pra mim, será um ano de arrasar”, confirmou Aguinaldo Silva no Facebook.

“Pra quem vem acompanhando as notícias, Doctor Pri teve mesmo a estreia transferida pra setembro na Globo. Longe do Carnaval e da Copa!”, avisou Brunno Pires no Twitter, colaborador do seriado.

No elenco estão confirmados os nomes de Gloria Pires, José Mayer e Paulo Rocha. O seriado, com 14 episódios — dos quais oito estão escritos —, terá direção de Marcos Schechtman e Fred Mayrink.

O Planeta TV

Fortaleza é a cidade que mais aprova no ITA

71 cearenses estão entre os 170 que passaram no vestibular 2014

Fortaleza foi a cidade brasileira que mais aprovou alunos no Instituto Tecnológico da Aeronáutica (ITA). Das 170 vagas disponibilizadas, 71 foram ocupadas por estudantes matriculados em colégios da Capital. O resultado do vestibular 2014 foi divulgado nesta sexta-feira (27).

Apenas 10 mulheres foram aprovadas no vestibular 2014 Foto: Agência Estado

“Passar no ITA é a realização de um sonho”, essa é a sensação descrita por Felipe Rolim, 18. O estudante tentava pelo segundo ano passar no vestibular e acredita que as horas de estudo foram recompensados com a aprovação. Felipe atribui o sucesso no exame ao apoio de familiares, professores e amigos.

Outro cearense que comemora o ingresso no ITA é Adam Matos. O estudante de 18 anos revela que o resultado representa anos de dedicação e empenho. “Sempre tentei me superar para atingir o grande objetivo: a tão sonhada aprovação”, festeja.

O resultado da capital cearense também é destaque quando comparado com o número de aprovados em outras cidades do País. São José dos Campos-SP, cidade sede do Instituto, é o segundo lugar da lista, com 37 alunos classificados.

O dono do Colégio Farias Brito, Tales de Sá, atribui o sucesso de Fortaleza no vestibular mais concorrido do Brasil ao empenho no trabalho. No caso do seu colégio ele afirma: “Trabalhamos em conjunto, formando um time, onde todos as pessoas são importantes”, destaca.

Participação feminina no vestibular 2014

Apenas 10 mulheres foram aprovadas dentro das 170 vagas disponibilizadas pelo ITA, sendo 3 são do Ceará. Ao todo, foram 1661 mulheres que disputavam vagas, representando 22,8% do total de candidatos.

No total, 7.279 estudantes disputavam uma vaga no ITA. 70% eram de escolas particulares e 30% fizeram curso preparatório. O balanço do vestibular de 2014 mostra ainda que a nota de corte foi de 62,5 chegando a ser inferior que a de 2013.

 Diário do Nordeste

Versatile Franjic on Postecoglou’s radar

Saturday, 28 December 2013 10:00 AM

Versatile Franjic on Postecoglou's radar

Ivan Franjic plays in midfield for Brisbane Roar, but at right back for the Socceroos. For Franjic, it doesn’t matter, as long as he’s on the park.

Franjic made his name in the A-League for Brisbane Roar, where he was signed ion a short-term contract in August 2009, as an injury replacement for Andrew Packer.

Franjic’s forward raids from right-back and non-stop energy soon convinced Roar to sign him to a permanent contract and he has since made over 100 appearances for the side currently atop the A-League.

Under Ange Postecoglou, Franjic was first choice right-back, but under Mike Mulvey he has been recast as a dynamic, box-to-box midfielder.

Franjic sees his new-found versatility as a positive, rather than a point of confusion.

“It has definitely helped me,” Franjic said.

“Versatility helps a lot. Especially for a coach, if they can put you in various positions. I’ve enjoyed playing there (in midfield).”

Postecoglou’s first match in charge of the Socceroos was the 1-0 win against Costa Rica, and it was no surprise to see Franjic involved.

The advantage of their previous relationship at Brisbane Roar, is familiarity.

“He knows me from our time at Brisbane,” Franjic said.

“We worked together for two and a half years, so he knows my strengths and weaknesses, and what I’m capable of.

“It helps a lot, but it’s also good for me as I know how he works.”

Franjic played 90 minutes against Costa Rica and was one of the Socceroos’ best players as the new era got underway. He played at right back, rather than the midfield position he has played for Roar this season.

He did, however, return to fullback in Roar’s 2-5 win over Sydney FC and Franjic said that he is happy changing positions, whether it be for the national team or for his club.

“I’ve been playing at fullback for five or six years, I feel comfortable there so it comes quite naturally,” Franjic said.

“I hope playing in midfield doesn’t have any effect (on national selection).

“I played at fullback on the weekend and I’m lucky that I can play in various positions.”

Franjic’s ability to play more than one position at a very high level, and Postecoglou’s existing knowledge of his talents, mean that he is a firm favourite to be on the plane to Brazil at the end of the season.

The 26-year-old insists that he is just focusing on his job at Roar and that whatever will be, will be.
“I just have to keep doing what I’m doing Brisbane,” he said.

“I have to show consistency, play 90 minutes, get in the right positions, defend and attack well, whether I’m playing fullback or midfield.”

One big addition to Franjic’s game is goals. Always capable of the spectacular, he is now a regular on the score sheet and that is something Postecoglou will have his eye on.

“Every player likes to score,” Franjic insisted.

“It’s something I’ve been practising a lot.

“Hopefully it can continue for the season and at the end of it, Brisbane Roar are champions.”

That, and the prospect of a place at the FIFA World Cup, is motivation enough for the talented Franjic, who with just six caps is at the start of what could be a prosperous international career.

Football Federation Australia

Boxing Day kindness

By Christine Linnell

10:48 AM Saturday Dec 28, 2013
Alex Hume, who lost his Christmas money, with his aunt Michelle Keene. Photo / supplied

Alex Hume, who lost his Christmas money, with his aunt Michelle Keene. Photo / supplied

In a show of holiday spirit, Greymouth residents have rallied to help a boy who lost his Christmas money when he went to spend it on Boxing Day.

Alex Hume, 12, had set aside about $190 in cash to buy an X-Box at The Warehouse sale, but on his way to the store the money went missing.

His mother, Wendy Frew, dropped him off and was waiting for him outside, because car troubles left her unable to lock the doors.

“I got a text from him saying ‘Is the money in the car? I can’t find it.”‘

Alex’s family were so upset about the lost money, his aunt Michelle Keene decided to ask Greymouth residents on Facebook if anyone had found it.

Messages of support came pouring in, and people began to offer donations to cheer him up.

“I couldn’t keep up with the notifications,” Ms Keene said.

They had not expected to receive donations, but people were so eager to help, Ms Keene arranged to let them transfer money to his account.

“(It’s) what Christmas is really about … those random acts of kindness from these people.”

Alex has received more than $100 so far, and if the donations go higher than the original amount the family will donate the rest to charity.

Ms Keene thanked everyone for their help and kind words.

“I feel quite proud and privileged to live in a community where people care.”

The Warehouse agreed to sell Alex an X-Box at the discounted price, even though he missed the Boxing Day sale.

– The Greymouth Star

2013! What a year

December 28, 2013 – 12:13AM

Andrew Hornery

Private Sydney Columnist

PRIVATE SYDNEY

-

Sydney’s Great Gatsby premiere. Photo: Belinda Rolland

Hindsight is a wonderful thing and, while it is impossible to do justice to the highlights of 2013, there have certainly been a few stories on the PS desk that have stood out over the past 12 months. Here’s a snapshot of a few of them. Enjoy.

DARTMOUTH ABBEY

PS’s year got off to a sensational start when former Sydney socialite Fiona Handbury, who these days is better known as Lady Dartmouth, ended up in the centre of a rather embarrassing aristocratic scandal in her adopted home of England where she is the wife of William Legge, the Earl of Dartmouth.

-

Challenged: Miranda Kerr’s shoot for Harper’s BAZAARPhoto: Harper’s Bazaar Australia

He had been arrested on suspicion of assault following a domestic dispute over where their television set should be positioned. Not only is the earl the grandson of the late ostrich-feather fancier Dame Barbara Cartland, his mother Raine Spencer was the stepmother of the late Diana, Princess of Wales.

Advertisement

According to the earl, Lady Dartmouth went to bed and fell into a “deep sleep”, before he “shook her awake . . . to clarify my point of view. Looking back it was an unwise thing to do as Fiona was deeply asleep and became disoriented”. Indeed.

SWAN DIVE

-

Chummy: Karl Stefanovic and Lisa Wilkinson. Photo: Getty Images

Former high-profile media identity Chrissie Swan has had a comparatively quiet end to the year after the ruckus she made back in February after PS revealed her management company was prepared to spend $53,000 to stop damning photos of her smoking while pregnant from reaching the news stands.

Swan’s management company, Watercooler, was bidding against Woman’s Day for the photos that the magazine ended up paying $55,000 for in one of the more extraordinary celebrity moments of the year. It blew open the lid on the lengths some personalities will go to in the quest to protect their “image”.

ELLEN LANDS

Erica Packer

New angle: Erica Packer at her Vogue Australia event.Photo: Edwina Pickles

When Ellen DeGeneres flew into Sydney Airport, the US talk show star danced in the arrivals hall, crowds of people broke into song and one poor girl fainted.

DeGeneres and her wife, expatriate Australian actor Portia de Rossi, and DeGeneres’ mother Betty were quickly ferried to the penthouse suite at the Intercontinental where they spent three days before going to Melbourne.

A string of covertly executed surprise appearances resulted in DeGeneres popping up all over the city to film her hit show, though it appeared de Rossi – known as Mandy Lee Rogers when she grew up in Geelong – was just as big a tourist as her famous wife, and certainly had a US accent nearly as thick.

Ellen Degeneres and Portia Di Rossi

Surprise: Ellen DeGeneres and Portia Di Rossi arrive in Sydney in March. Photo: James Brickwood

MIRANDA FINDS HER WINGS

According to Miranda Kerr: “Sometimes, challenges and struggles are exactly what we need in our lives . . . May you welcome every effort, every struggle, and every challenge . . . May you open your wings and fly!” After the year she has had, Miranda must have flown to the moon and back.

Things started getting rocky back in February when PS broke the news her days with David Jones could soon be coming to an end and, sure enough, by March she was out of the multimillion-dollar gig.

-

All done: Rupert Murdoch and Wendi Deng. Photo: Getty Images

Soon her coveted role as a Victoria’s Secret angel was scuttled when the model was “de-winged”, only then for her to announce, after months of denials, that her marriage to Hollywood heart-throb Orlando Bloom had come to an end, after just three years and the birth of their son Flynn.

DONE, OVER

The Kerr-Bloom split was one of several high-profile marriage breakdowns that kept things busy at the PS desk, including James Packer filing for divorce from Erica, his second wife of six years and mother of his three children.

-

Loud and clear: The Voice’s Seal and Joel Madden.

That news reverberated around Sydney, with some of Packer’s closest friends refusing to believe it was true, despite the billionaire confirming the news following PS’s inquiries back in September.

Just weeks before, Erica had been posing in the grounds of a French chateau with the couple’s children for a spread in Vogue Australia that was initially intended to showcase the happy family. The story had to be quickly re-written when Erica discovered she was about to become another ex-Mrs Packer. The paint was barely dry on the huge and very empty $60 million mansion the couple had built in Vaucluse.

And while Kerr says she is “not in a relationship with anyone”, news of her blooming romance with Packer has certainly raised eyebrows, especially for Packer’s latest ex-wife, who hails from the same country town as Kerr: Gunnedah in north-west NSW.

samantha armytage

Samantha Armytage.

Equally surprising was the news of Rupert Murdoch’s divorce from Wendi Deng, his third wife of 14 years and mother of his two youngest daughters. They appeared to part ways faster than a speeding Lazy Susan.

And while PS is still reeling from the news Shane Warne and Liz Hurley are no longer lovebirds, it is nothing compared to the devastation being felt around the offices of Hello! magazine, which was preparing to cover their wedding.

SEAL SQUIRMS

-

Liz Hurley and Shane Warne. Photo: Getty Images

Arguably the greatest celebrity fail this year belongs to talent show judge and sometime singer Seal, who botched things up royally in June during the controversy over marijuana being found in the room of his The Voice co-host Joel Madden at The Darling hotel in the Star casino.

The Grammy award-winning singer tweeted he was unable to stand by and “watch you attempt to destroy my Brother, you gun one you gun us all!” in a broad comment on the story’s treatment by the Australian media.

In the series of angry missives, Seal took aim at the Star and Australia’s “trash media” after less than five grams of cannabis was found in Madden’s room while he was doing a meet and greet with cancer patients.

But Seal struck a dud note, and was soon offering a social media mea culpa for his outburst.

“I want to apologise for my rant earlier. Joel is one of my best friends and I was really hurting for him,” Seal tweeted. “I want to say I have loved being in Australia, I’ve loved working on The Voice and with an incredibly talented group of Australian artists. It’s been almost 11 weeks away from my kids and me saying ‘I can’t wait to go home’ was me missing being home with them.”

Interestingly, Seal will not be returning for next year’s show, although Madden will be.

GATSBY HAD ALL THAT JAZZ

It was a long time coming but, regardless of what people thought of the film, the Sydney premiere of The Great Gatsby will go down as the best party of the year, hands down.

In New York they draped feather boas from crystal chandeliers at The Plaza hotel, in Cannes they sipped Moet under an art-deco dome overlooking the Cote d’Azur, but in Sydney Baz Luhrmann easily eclipsed the other premieres when he recreated one of Jay Gatsby’s fictional hedonistic parties for 1200 VIPs.

For just one night, New York in the Roaring 20s had been recreated in Sydney, complete with jazz bands, dancers hoisting giant bottles of Moet and models dressed as elegant flappers dripping in Tiffany diamonds.

At the after party, guests were greeted with a 10-metre champagne tower, as 700 magnums were splashed about the crowd that included Lachlan and Sarah Murdoch, Gillian Armstrong, George Miller, Barry Otto, Seal, Skye Leckie, Delta Goodrem, Simon Crean, Danielle Spencerand Ryan Stokes.

It was a way for Luhrmann to thank the city in which he created Gatsby, a $180 million production, underwritten by taxpayers to the tune of $40 million, but which had managed to keep Sydney’s struggling film industry ticking over.

HOT AIR, ON AIR

In terms of feuds, the duelling divas Mike Carlton and Ray Hadley gave us all a show in May when Carlton fumed about the ABC’s treatment of his comments during an Australian Story episode on Hadley.

Carlton launched a stinging attack, claiming his comments were “selectively edited” by the show’s producers to give a glowing account of his former radio nemesis Hadley, describing the program as a “travesty”, “disgrace” and “garbage”.

Within a nanosecond, Hadley fired back, telling PS: “I’d imagine Mr Carlton’s anger has more to do with the fact he was shown the door at 2UE after his ratings failure, and the day after the Australian Story [program], I recorded my 74th consecutive ratings win.” Hug it out, fellas.

MORNING SICKNESS

It was not so much what made it on the screen as what was happening behind the cameras of Australia’s breakfast television shows that kept PS busy throughout the year, starting off with the removal of Melissa Doyle from co-hosting Seven’s Sunrise, to be replaced by Samantha Armytage, who apparently dropped a dress size by dozing off, according to her “sleep diet” story in Woman’s Day.

But it wasn’t long before our attention was focused on the spectacular demise of Channel Nine’s Today executive producer Neil Breen. The former Sunday Telegraph editor learnt the hard way about dealing with TV stars, which ranged from a “bollocking” of presenter Ben Fordhamto co-host Lisa Wilkinson storming off the show, reduced to tears in her dressing room after one of “EP’s Pet” Karl Stefanovic’s jibes missed her funny bone.

Last month it was announced Breen was moving on, far, far away from Today.

And yet all that paled next to what was happening behind the scenes at Channel Ten’s multimillion-dollar breakfast onslaught with Wake Up and Studio Ten.

Within days of their debuts, executive producer Adam Boland was on “indefinite leave” in Vanuatu, having abandoned ship as they sank in the ratings. He returned a fortnight later, only to sack one of Wake Up’s hosts – Natasha Exelby – before he disappeared again on leave.

The Sydney Morning Herald

Brisbane weather forecast promises hot finish to 2013

December 27, 2013

brisbane06 Business Class to Brisbane

Feeling hot, hot, hot?  Just wait for Sunday.

While the mercury won’t drop below 32 degrees across Brisbane and the Gold and Sunshine Coasts on Saturday, Sunday is set to be the one of the hottest days of the year.

Brisbane is predicted to hit 37 degrees, while Ipswich will top 40.  Sea breezes will help temper the heat for the Gold and Sunshine Coasts, which will make for a slightly more bearable 33 degrees.

The sweltering is due to start early – Saturday night is expected to reach at least 22 degrees across the south east, with the heat hitting early and hard on Sunday morning.

Advertisement

Weatherzone meteorologist Ben McBurney said there was unlikely to be any afternoon relief.

“Most of the storms will be further west than the coast, the Sunshine and Gold Coasts’ hinterlands will be more likely to see storms; likewise for the western suburbs of Brisbane – I think there will be a pretty slim chance of them hitting the coast,” he said.

“We have on-shore winds on the coast which are creating more stable conditions – the sea breeze creates less warm air.  Storms need hot, humid air and the sea breeze on the coast creates a cooling effect, which is not ideal for storms.  We also have upper-level steering winds, which are favouring storms which move south to north rather than west to east.

“Most storms will stay along the hinterland areas then, or at least west of the coast.”

Looking forward and while La Nina may have moved on, forecasters are still expecting an average cyclone season across the nation, because of warmer waters across Australia generally.

In Queensland, rainfall is expected to be a little above average for what is left of summer, with the rain continuing into the cooler months, making for a wet autumn.

Weatherzone is owned by Fairfax Media, publisher of this website.

The Brisbane Times

Zimbabwe ambassador to Australia Jacqueline Zwambila defects

December 28, 2013

Phillip Thomson

Reporter at The Canberra Times.

Zimbabwe’s ambassador to Australia has lashed out at the regime of President Robert Mugabe and is seeking a protection visa so she can stay in Australia.

I don’t feel safe about returning to Zimbabwe at all.

Ambassador Jacqueline Zwambila has asked the Australian government for asylum because she fears for her safety if she returns to Zimbabwe.

Zimbabwe Ambassador Jacqueline Zwambila has asked the Australian Government for asylum because she fears for her safety if she returns to Zimbabwe.

Zimbabwe Ambassador Jacqueline Zwambila has asked the Australian Government for asylum because she fears for her safety if she returns to Zimbabwe. Photo: Melissa Adams

With four days remaining as ambassador she has moved out of her residence, but has no intention of using the business class plane ticket given to her by her government to fly back home on Tuesday.

Advertisement

”I don’t feel safe about returning to Zimbabwe at all,” she said.

Ms Zwambila will rely on a bridging visa after her diplomatic status is cancelled and a small number of family members who have been with her in Australia also hope to gain protection under her application.

One treasured item she took with her from the residence when she moved out on Friday was a framed graduate diploma in international relations from the Australian National University, which she received two weeks earlier.

For a short time before her departure the diploma hung in the hallway opposite an official portrait of Mr Mugabe.

That portrait, along with furniture owned by the embassy, has been left behind at the empty residence in Red Hill.

Ms Zwambila, politically aligned to Morgan Tsvangirai’s Movement for Democratic Change, was recalled from her post without being offered another job after Mugabe’s Zanu-PF party controversially won the country’s July 31 general election.

Mr Mugabe, 89, won power for the next five years when he finished with 61 per cent of the vote compared to MDC’s 39 per cent amid claims of intimidation and tampering with electoral rolls and the allegation up to one million voters were turned away from polling places.

Mr Mugabe called on his opponents to accept defeat or commit suicide.

“But I tell them even dogs will not sniff at their flesh if they choose to die that way,” was the punch line he gave The New York Times.

Following the poll, Australia’s foreign minister at the time, Bob Carr, called for the election to be re-run and said doubts about the election being free and fair meant Australia would not lift existing travel bans and financial sanctions against 33 individuals and one Zimbabwean entity.

The Australian government had offered reduced sanctions as an incentive for fair elections.

Sitting in her residence before she moved out, Ms Zwambila said Mr Mugabe and Zanu-PF had stolen the election and had followed up by increasing arrests of MDC supporters on trumped up charges.

She feared indefinite custody if she returned. The ambassador said among other allegations she has been threatened with arrest in Zimbabwe because a court found she had not paid $2700 to a tradesman who worked on the house she owns there. She denied owing the money.

Ms Zwambila said her $150,000 house in Zimbabwe would be auctioned against her will to pay the bill.

Amnesty International highlighted how policing had become politicised when more than 20 of Ms Zwambila’s fellow party members were arrested and spent a year or more in custody for the alleged murder of a police officer before being acquitted. One of them, Rebecca Mafikeni, 29, died in custody in August after spending two years in remand awaiting trial. It was the same month the election result was announced.

Ms Zwambila said when she heard about Mr Mugabe’s victory she saw ”doom, a black cloud”.

”I knew then it was the end of my term.”

Claims in 2010 she stripped naked during a fit of rage in front of staff in Canberra were proven to be false at more than one tier of the Australian legal system during a defamation case which finally concluded in the High Court last week.

A Canberra judge struck out the defence offered by freelance journalist Panganai Reason Wafawarova, who argued his report was true and in the public interest.

Zimbabwean state-run newspaper The Herald had published the claims made about the ambassador and The Australian also ran Wafawarova’s claims days later. An incensed Ms Zwambila launched a lawsuit against The Australian’s publisher, News Limited, and Wafawarova in 2011.

Court papers say Wafawarova was motivated out of malice as an ”agent

of the Mugabe regime”. She reached a confidential settlement with The Australian in March 2011.

Wafawarova tried to defend his reporting, arguing the allegations were true, an opinion, fair comment and in the public interest.

The case stalled after Wafawarova repeatedly flouted court orders by failing to provide documents relevant to the case.

A hearing in April will decide the amount Wafawarova must pay the ambassador.

Anybody who types her name into Google is still flooded with reports of the stripping allegation but as she packed her things Ms Zwambila said: ”They’ve failed to destroy me and my integrity remains intact.”

It was her opposition to Mr Mugabe that essentially brought her to Canberra in 2010. The Movement for Democratic Change won the bloody 2008 election but a power-sharing agreement was struck after Mr Mugabe refused to stand down.

As a consequence of the agreement, a handful of MDC-aligned diplomats were sent to Australia, Germany, Sudan, Nigeria and Senegal and at least three have been recalled since the election.

Ms Zwambila plans to return to activism which she hopes she can do from abroad: ”The future looks bleak under this government,” she said.

The ambassador’s request for protection and public statement that the Zimbabwe election was stolen ends a sunny period for Australia-Zimbabwe relations.

During her four years as ambassador Australia became a significant financial contributor to Zimbabwe aid and development.

From 2005-06 to 2007-08, Zimbabwe received $5.6 million of Australian funds, according to the Department of Foreign Affairs. Since the start of 2009 Zimbabwe has received more than $177 million.

The ambassador’s criticism of the Mugabe regime comes as the Abbott Government reviews foreign expenditure and plans to cut $4.5 billion in the projected increase of aid and development spending between now and 2016-17.

Since the Coalition took government in September, Foreign Affairs Minister Julie Bishop has not updated Australia’s stance towards Zimbabwe. The Coalition took a hard line under former prime minister John Howard who successfully lobbied for Zimbabwe to be excluded from the Commonwealth for human rights abuses, called off a cricket tour in 2007 and labelled Mr Mugabe a ”grubby dictator” – which probably led to Mr Howard being spurned for the top job at the International Cricket Council later in life.

Ms Bishop has frontline experience in Zimbabwe. In 2000 and 2002, as a federal MP, Ms Bishop returned from Zimbabwe with stories of violence and intimidation after she travelled there as part of a Commonwealth observer team. ”There was no freedom from fear,” she said then.

More recently the United Nations World Food Program has said Zimbabwe faces the worst famine since 2009 with 2.2 million people requiring food aid.

In a Christmas message to supporters Mr Tsvangirai said Zimbabwe was returning to the chaos of 2008, citing worsening power shortages and a liquidity crunch.

”Hunger is stalking the nation while food and farming inputs are being distributed selectively and continue to be used as a political weapon,” he wrote.

Ms Zwambila’s father was an entrepreneur who started as a bookkeeper and ended up building supermarkets and cocktail bars. She said it was a time when the highest an African could rise in society was to sell groceries, or become a teacher.

Growing up, she attended an elite multinational school, a place where African students were excluded from sports such as netball.

It was a lonely time. There was no protection from racist teachers yet she did not have the option of running away. She had to stay to receive an education her parents were working hard to pay for. Ms Zwambila became a political activist, built her own public relations business and is now a grandmother.

”I’ve had to fight the whole system,” she said when interviewed by Fairfax Media last year.

”I’m a fighter.”

The Canberra Times