“Programa da Tarde” e “Cidade Alerta” alcançam altos índices na Record

https://i0.wp.com/m.natelinha.ne10.uol.com.br//imagem/noticia/detalhe/df238ead5d47efbf028c7bb1540d3709.jpg
A Record atingiu altos índices de audiência na tarde desta última terça-feira (23) com o “Programa da Tarde” e o “Cidade Alerta”.
O “Programa da Tarde” alcançou média de 6,5 pontos e teve uma das melhores performances de todo o ano. Já, em sua sequência, o “Cidade Alerta”, de Marcelo Rezende, também. O noticiário policial obteve 11 pontos de média.
Apesar da alta, a revista eletrônica da Record não ocupou a vice-liderança durante todo seu período. No SBT, “Marimar”, “Cuidado com o Anjo” e “Rubi” tiveram 6, 7,5 e 7 pontos de média respectivamente.
Já o “Cidade” foi vice-líder isolado e com ampla folga sobre seus concorrentes. Ainda que “Eu, a Patroa e as Crianças” tenha marcardo 8 pontos de média, outros programas que competiram com Rezende ficaram distantes de sua pontuação.
O “Casos de Família”, por exemplo, teve 5 pontos. O “SBT Brasil”, 6.
Esses índices são consolidados e são baseados na preferência de um grupo de telespectadores da Grande São Paulo.
Logotipo Na Telinha

Punahou St. homicide victim was Honolulu realtor, actress

Posted: Jul 24, 2013 5:44 PM

Updated: Jul 24, 2013 8:16 PM

Mary Beth San Juan

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) –

The body of a woman who was discovered bound, gagged and wrapped inside a carpet in the driveway of a Punahou Street home has been identified by law enforcement sources and a family member of the victim.

Hawaii News Now has learned that Mary Beth San Juan, 58, is believed to have been killed several days before her body was discovered at around 7:20 p.m. on Tuesday evening.

San Juan’s ex-husband was reportedly searching for the victim, who he had not heard from since having dinner with her Saturday evening, when he and a security guard from a nearby condominium smelled a foul odor and discovered the body in the driveway.

Her ex-husband had reportedly come to the home at around 7 p.m. and flagged down the guard when he was unable to find her or her car. Police reportedly recovered the victim’s 2013 silver Mercedes at Kapiolani Park early Wednesday morning.

The Facebook page believed to belong to San Juan’s son Philip, reported to be a 2007 graduate from Maryknoll School, has been changed to show a photo of he and the victim with several messages of condolences.

Records show San Juan was a real estate agent and a member of the Scott Rogers acting club in Honolulu.

Related Story:

 

Nury Martinez wins Los Angeles City Council race

Nury Martinez, a former Los Angeles school board trustee, defeats Cindy Montañez in the race to fill L.A.’s 6th District seat. She is City Hall’s only elected female officeholder.

Candidates Nury Martinez and Cindy Montañez

Los Angeles City Council District 6 candidates Nury Martinez, left, and Cindy Montanez, right, are shown during a forum mediated by Judy Daniels, center, at a Valley Alliance Neighborhood Councils meeting at Sherman Oaks Hospital. (Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times / July 11, 2013)

 

By Catherine SaillantJuly 24, 2013, 12:25 a.m.

Former Los Angeles school board member Nury Martinez pulled off a come-from-behind victory Tuesday in her race against rival Cindy Montañez for an open City Council seat in the east San Fernando Valley to become City Hall’s only elected female officeholder.

Just two months ago Montañez, a former state senator, led Martinez by 19 percentage points in the primary election. She had been far ahead in fundraising during the runoff. But Martinez overcame her disadvantages to pull ahead Tuesday night by 10 points, taking 55% of the vote to Montañez’s 45%. Turnout was a low 10.2% of the more than 89,000 registered voters.

“I feel like I just overcame an impossible mission,” Martinez said. “The people responded. I can’t wait to get to work.”

Montañez said she called Martinez around 11 p.m., when the final tally was posted by the city clerk’s office. “It was definitely a hard-fought campaign,” Montañez said. “I think there’s a lot of things that we can do together to improve Council District 6. This doesn’t change that.”

The candidates fought to gain voters’ attention in a race that concluded just two months after a new mayor, city attorney and controller were elected and eight months after the president’s reelection.

Balloting was light throughout the day. Polls opened at 7 a.m. and about five hours later, one poll worker, who declined to give a name because the workers were not authorized to speak to reporters, said, “I’ve been going around precinct to precinct and it’s been very low numbers.”

Only 36 people had voted by midday at a polling place at the Church on the Way in Van Nuys — and that was a location where two precincts were combined, the poll worker said.

Montañez, 39, an executive at the Department of Water and Power, positioned herself as an experienced negotiator who would get things done.

She said the district had been neglected by City Hall and promised to bring new vitality to neighborhoods, including shops and eateries along the Van Nuys Boulevard corridor.

Martinez, 40, promised to make the east San Fernando Valley communities of Van Nuys, Pacoima and Sun Valley cleaner, safer and more business-friendly. She also pledged to address crime in the parks and along San Fernando Road.

The campaign took a sharp turn last week when Martinez said in a Los Angeles Times interview that she had been sexually abused as a small child. She said she decided to share her story after her rival sent out attack mailers accusing her of not doing enough to protect students from predatory teachers as a member of the Los Angeles Unified School District board.

Both women are daughters of immigrant parents. They were raised in the northeast Valley and speak fluent Spanish in the heavily Latino district.

Sandra Jimenez, 27, and two of her friends came out to Panorama Recreation Center to support Montañez.

“She has the experience,” Jimenez said. “She was the youngest in the Senate and now she’s ready to take on our city. She will bring change to our city.”

John Clement, 58, said his family was hounded by the two candidates.

Both Martinez and Montañez sent representatives to his home to persuade his family to cast their ballots for them.

In the end, he chose to vote for Martinez.

“We like the fact that she was a teacher and her overall background,” he said as his son, Joshua Clement, 28, nodded in agreement.

catherine.saillant@latimes.com

Times staff writers Ari Bloomekatz and Angel Jennings contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2013, Los Angeles Times

Moscow River Passing on Its Pollutants

Pollutants in the Moscow River, including sulfur, oil, heavy metals and aluminum, pose risks for people’s health.

Vladimir Filonov / MT

Pollutants in the Moscow River, including sulfur, oil, heavy metals and aluminum, pose risks for people’s health.

 

The quantity of industrial pollutants in the Moscow River significantly exceeds safety standards, according to a study by Greenpeace Russia.

These pollutants, which include sulfur, oil, heavy metals and aluminum, are deemed a risk not only to the local ecosystem but also to people’s health according to the study, which was released this week.

Greenpeace tested samples of the Moscow River taken in June from 10 locations south of the Kremlin. All of the samples showed that the capital had excessive levels of pollutants. In one test, location mercury levels exceeded Russia’s water safety standards by 20 times. In another, manganese surpassed these levels by 120 times.

The substances pose a health risk if they get into the drinking water. This will not happen in Moscow because the reservoirs that supply the city with water, like those near Istra and Pushkino, are west and north of the city and either relatively far from the Moscow River or take water from the river at its cleaner, upstream locations, said Dmitry Artamonov, head of the toxic program at Greenpeace Russia.

However, cities on the Oka and Volga rivers, which the Moscow River drains into, are at risk. These include Ulyanovsk, Samara, Astrakhan, Nizhny Novgorod, Volgograd, Ryazan and Murom.

River pollution, though typical in large cities, is not as severe in Europe as it is in Russia, Artamonov said. Though he could not compare numbers, Artamonov said European rivers are likely cleaner because local manufacturers have stopped using the most dangerous toxic chemicals in their production cycles.

“The Russian government doesn’t do anything to encourage or force manufacturers to curb their toxic pollution,” Artamonov said. “It is only when ecological needs coincide with economic imperatives that the enterprises do anything.”

Greenpeace carried out a similar study in St. Petersburg’s Neva River last year. There were more toxic substances found in the Neva than in the Moscow River, likely because of the greater number of industrial enterprises along its banks, Artamonov said.

The Volga and Amur rivers also have more toxic substances than the Moscow River.

The Moscow Times

Korea DPR not ready for ‘productive’ talks: ex-U.S. envoy

By Oh Seok-min
SEOUL, July 23 (Yonhap) — North Korea doesn’t appear to be prepared for any “productive” dialogue with the international community, showing few signs of change, a former United States ambassador to Seoul said Tuesday.

After months of simmering tensions triggered by its third nuclear test in February and bellicose threats against South Korea and the U.S., North Korea has shifted to a charm offensive, offering talks with them.

Seoul and Washington, however, have called on Pyongyang to first demonstrate its sincerity for denuclearization through actions before such talks take place.

“Dialogue takes two parties to have an effective, productive dialogue. And I have seen very little sign that North Korea is prepared to have a productive dialogue now,” Thomas Hubbard said in an interview with Yonhap News Agency in Seoul.

He arrived here on Sunday for a six-day trip to meet high-level officials including Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se to explore ways to further improve the 60-year-old Seoul-Washington alliance.

Hubbard served as ambassador to Seoul from 2001 to 2004 and played a key role in U.S. negotiations with North Korea in the 1990s. He is now the chairman of the Korea Society, a New York-based organization promoting people-to-people ties between the two allies.

Pointing to Pyongyang’s series of provocations, Hubbard said it is “hard to be optimistic” about the North, at least for now.

“Initial impressions (about North Korean leader Kim Jong-un) were misleading that he was warm and more engaging. In fact, his policy is just the same as his father and his grandfather,” he said.

The six-party talks that involve the two Koreas, the U.S., China, Japan and Russia “is useful to bring all parties together,” but the U.S. is “not ready to have dialogue just for the dialogue’s sake,” Hubbard said, urging the North to show “concrete signs” of willingness to denuclearize.

The multilateral talks aimed at persuading the North to discard its nuclear programs were suspended in December 2008 after the North walked out of the dialogue in protest of the United Nations’ condemnation of its banned rocket launch.

“I think now the ball is in the North Korean court,” he said. “They can either choose the economic development or useless nuclear weapons.”

Hubbard, known for his extensive experience with and expertise in Korean affairs, spoke highly of South Korean President Park Geun-hye’s signature “trustpolitik” policy, saying the U.S. President Barack Obama “firmly and strongly supports her with the approach.”

Asked of his assessment on Seoul’s request for another delay in the schedule for the takeover of wartime operational control (OPCON) of its troops by the agreed-upon date of December 2015, he simply said the key is not the timing but the way it is pushed for.

“We would not be common on the precise timing of when the OPCON transfer should takes place, but none of us want to do anything that would weaken our deterrence. That should be the sign of strength, not weakness, in our alliance,” he said.

graceoh@yna.co.kr
(END)

 

Yonhap News Agency

Seoul, Washington begin talks on cost-sharing for U.S. forces

KORUSA

 

SEOUL, July 24 (Yonhap) — South Korea and the United States kicked off negotiations Wednesday on sharing the cost of stationing American troops here, with increased North Korean threats and U.S. budgetary problems expected to influence the bilateral talks.

The two-day meeting in Seoul is the second round of the ongoing talks in which the allies will determine how much each side would pay of the cost needed to maintain the 28,500 U.S. troops here during the period of 2014-18.

South Korean chief negotiator Hwang Joon-kook and his U.S. counterpart Eric John held their inaugural meeting in Washington in early July.

At the start of the meeting, Hwang told the U.S. official that “we look forward to having productive and in-depth discussions … I hope we can narrow our differences in the spirit of alliance.”

South Korea began shouldering part of the cost needed to station the U.S. Forces Korea (USFK) here in 1991, when the Special Measurement Agreement (SMA) was first signed.

Under the SMA, last revised in 2008 to cover five years until 2013, South Korea has paid over 40 percent of the USFK defense costs.

This year’s negotiations are expected to be unusually bumpy as the U.S. is reportedly trying to increase the South Korean portion to 50 percent amid budgetary difficulties in the U.S., according to a government source.

Rising security threats from the North and South Korea’s request for another delay in the schedule to regain the wartime operational control of its troops from the U.S. set for 2015 are expected to influence the ongoing negotiations.

The U.S. troops are stationed in South Korea under a mutual defense treaty aimed at deterring potential aggression from North Korea. It is a legacy of the 1950-53 Korean War, which ended in a cease-fire, not a peace treaty, leaving the two Koreas technically in a state of war.

pbr@yna.co.kr
(END)

 

Yonhap News Agency

Top 5: As maiores audiências das emissoras em São Paulo (08/07 a 14/07/2013)

São Paulo

 :globo:
Amor à Vida 34
Jornal Nacional 25
Atlético Mg X N Old Boys 25
Tapas e Beijos 25
Novela Ii – Sangue Bom 24

:sbt:
Carrossel 12
Programa Silvio Santos 9
A Praça E Nossa Not 9
Roda A Roda Jequiti 9
Tela De Sucessos 8

:record:
Domingo Espetacular 13
Jose Do Egito 12
Cidade Alerta 10
Jornal Da Record 8
A Fazenda 8

:band:
Pânico Na Band 7
Brasil Urgente Sb Loc 7
Policia 24h 5
Brasil Urgente Sb 5
Brasil Urgente 1 5

:redetv:
Te Peguei 2
Teste De Fidelidade 2
Mega Senha 2
Operacao De Risco Not 2
Tv Fama 2

:cultura:
Planeta Terra Dm 3
Cyberchase Ves 2
Os Sete Monstrinhos Ves 2
Viola Minha Viola Mat 2
Doug Ves 2

:gazeta:
Gazeta Esportiva 2
Mulheres 3 1
Mesa Redonda 1
Mulheres 2 1
Gazeta News Ves 1

Volta de “Rebelde” pode mudar o horário do “SBT Brasil”; entenda

RBD

Conforme já noticiado pelo TV Foco, o SBT readquiriu os direitos da novela mexicana “Rebelde”. O diretor de programação da emissora, Murilo Fraga, juntamente com outros profissionais, está estudando a melhor data para relançar o folhetim, que foi um sucesso entre 2005 e 2006.

Segundo o colunista José Armando Vannuci, na Anhanguera há quem defenda que a trama entre no ar após o “SBT Brasil”, antes de “Chiquitas”. O desafio será fazer o ajuste certo para abrir espaço para a reprise da novela.

Os fãs de “Rebelde” sempre pediram a emissora de Silvio Santos uma reprise, atrás de redes sociais, mas como a Rede Record havia adquirido os direitos para fazer um remake, ficou inviável uma reexibição.

Confira os Consolidados da Record em Curitiba – (22/07)

Religioso 2,4
Desenhos 4,1
Paraná no Ar 5,6
Fala Brasil 6,5
Hoje em Dia 6,2
Desenhos 7,5
Balanço Geral 10,7
Ver Mais 7,1
Programa da Tarde 5,4
Cidade Alerta 9,4
Ric Notícias 12,9
Jornal da Record 7,8
CSI: Nova york 6,1
Dona Xepa 8,0
A Fazenda 9,9
Roberto Justus + 5,2
Religioso 2,5